Toyota Prius Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a set of wheels to mount my snow tires. I bought 16" wheels off a late model Corolla and then discovered that they are the wrong bolt pattern. Drat and double drat!!
Does anyone know what vehicles, besides the Prius V, use that size rim and bolt pattern? I cannot seem to find anything locally and really don't want to spend for new steel wheels. Is there a crossover to another car?
Does anyone have a set of Prius V wheels that they would like to part with?
Does anyone need a nice set of aftermarket rims for a late model Corolla?? I am in Maine.
Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hey Pete, I actually did some intensive research into rims when I first got mine, as I got it with a broken rim. It is 5 lugs by 100mm, will be shown as 5x100. The rims do not have to be exactly 16', they could be 15', 17', 18' and so on. All that changes is the actual diameter of the rim itself, not the tire diameter.

I ended up buying jetta rims from a guy online really cheap (craigslist, offerup, fb marketplace, try all of those) that were 5x100, and rim was 15'. It already had tires on and luckily were exactly as the ones I was replacing. They were 195 mm in width, and the tire itself was 65% surface area compared to rim, and they fit on 15' rims. It will say 195/65r15 on the tire and that's what those numbers mean. If you find rims that are an inch smaller or larger than what you are looking for, dont overlook them, as they could be the right size for your car. There are online calculators that can calculate tire size based off its % number and the rim diameter. I would look for rims that already have tires on them to save you the trouble of having to buy a whole new set of tires.

Another thing to consider is width of rim and also the position of the center. Larger width will get you more grip and traction on the road, but it will lower your mpg and also might rub in your wheel well. I advise to get rims with width that is close to stock as possible to avoid those issues. And the stock prius rims have a positive off-center number of E40. Which means the rims lugnuts stick outwards, and not inwards like some trucks or jeeps might. E0 would mean that the lugnuts will be dead center of the rim, and negative numbers mean the rim lug nuts are closer to the inside of the rim. If you get something with E20 or less, it will look like your vehicle is using spacers to push the wheels outwards.

Hope this helped, and your most important thing to look for is 5x100 lugnut pattern.
 

·
Super Moderator
'17 C 4
Joined
·
697 Posts
And while you are waiting for the next snowfall.............
You might want to do some serious searching for information on the effectiveness of "snow tires" in general.

When I did that many years ago, I found out that the "snow tires" were really better ONLY in a very specific set
of circumstances; the same situation where it is easy to pack a snowball.
A bit colder or warmer than that......and the snow tires were actually worse.

So I haven't bothered with them in over 50 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
And while you are waiting for the next snowfall.............
You might want to do some serious searching for information on the effectiveness of "snow tires" in general.

When I did that many years ago, I found out that the "snow tires" were really better ONLY in a very specific set
of circumstances; the same situation where it is easy to pack a snowball.
A bit colder or warmer than that......and the snow tires were actually worse.

So I haven't bothered with them in over 50 years.
I appreciate your thoughts. Polymer compounds have changed a lot in 50 years and given that you live in Florida, I understand you are not using snow tires. You mentioned in another post that at one time you lived “above the Mason Dixon line”. The weather we deal with in Maine is closer to that of Quebec than Georgia. All weather radials simply don’t cut it in our conditions. I am still looking for another set of 16” wheels for my 2012 Prius V. Thanks again.
 

·
Super Moderator
'17 C 4
Joined
·
697 Posts
I appreciate your thoughts. Polymer compounds have changed a lot in 50 years and given that you live in Florida, I understand you are not using snow tires.
Most of my life was spent in Illinois and Iowa, thus the interest in driving in the snow.

So now forget about Florida and read my post again.

Actual "snow tires" ONLY work better when the snow is the right consistency to stick together and pack into those wide, deep treads.
They do not work better if it is REALLY cold and the snow is light and fluffy.
They do not work better if the snow is "wet" and sloppy.

But it's your money so do whatever you please.
I still suggest that you might actually learn something if you would really research the subject.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Most of my life was spent in Illinois and Iowa, thus the interest in driving in the snow.

So now forget about Florida and read my post again.

Actual "snow tires" ONLY work better when the snow is the right consistency to stick together and pack into those wide, deep treads.
They do not work better if it is REALLY cold and the snow is light and fluffy.
They do not work better if the snow is "wet" and sloppy.

But it's your money so do whatever you please.
I still suggest that you might actually learn something if you would really research the subject.
Good luck.
😉👍
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top